WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO START SOCIAL SECURITY RETIREMENT BENEFITS?

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO START SOCIAL SECURITY RETIREMENT BENEFITS?

As more baby boomers approach retirement, they will need to decide when to begin receiving Social Security retirement benefits. The earliest date you can claim Social Security retirement benefits is age 62. You will receive a reduced monthly benefit at age 62 because (if you live to full life expectancy) you will be receiving checks for a longer time. If you wait until full retirement age (age 66 for those born 1943-1954, age 67 for those born 1960 and later, and 66 and some months on a graduated scale for those born between 1955 and 1959), you will receive a higher monthly benefit, but based on life expectancy, you will not receive it for as long as if you had begun to receive it at age 62. You can wait until age 70 to start benefits, for a higher yet monthly benefit (since you won’t receive it as long, based upon life expectancy).
If you start receiving benefits before your full retirement age, your monthly benefit may be reduced if you continue to work. If you take benefits early, as of 2012 you can earn up to $14,640 per year from work without reducing your benefits. In general, above $14,640 per year, you will lose $1 in benefits for each $2 you earn from working. Your benefit will not be reduced because of income from sources other than working (like interest or dividends). If you wait until full retirement age to take Social Security, you can keep working and earn as much as you like without losing benefits.
So, how do you decide? Here are some factors:
1. How long do you expect to live? The “breakeven” point for all 3 scenarios where they work out the same (claiming at 62, claiming at full retirement age, and claiming at age 70) is 85 years according to the Social Security Administration (SSA). Based on your health and family history, if you do not think you will live to be 85, you may do better to take Social Security as early as possible. If you think you will likely live beyond age 85, and if you can wait until age 70, you may collect the most in benefits over your lifetime.
2. As of 2012, if you want to keep working and you are fortunate to earn substantially more than $14,640 per year, your monthly benefit at age 62 may be quite small. For example, if you earn $30,000 per year, you will lose about $640 a month off your monthly benefit.
3. What about health insurance? You will not qualify for Medicare until age 65. For cost reasons, you may want or need to keep health insurance through your job until you reach age 65. Alternatively, if you can be added to a spouse’s employer policy, that may bridge the gap.
4. What will your retirement financial needs be? SSA and many financial planners advise having about 70% of your pre-retirement income for a comfortable retirement. Depending on your Social Security benefit, your other savings, and your living expenses, you may need to work past age 62.
To compare different options, visit your local Social Security Office (in Durham or Burlington), or go to www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator. There are many other issues to consider with Social Security and Medicare. We will address these topics in separate articles.

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